Menopause Hair Loss

menopause hair loss

Most women take a lot of pride in their hair and losing it has a devastating impact on their confidence and feelings of femininity.

You may be surprised to know, but around two-thirds of women have to deal with hair loss at some point in life.   If there is a connection between menopause and hair loss, it is possible a reaction to low thyroid function, which is common amongst menopausal women.

 

Symptoms Of  Menopause Hair Loss And Hair Thinning:

  • Hair falls out in large clumps when washing it.
  • Large snarls of hair appear in brush or comb.
  • Scalp is red, oily, or itchy.
  • Overall thinning rather than specific areas of baldness.

How Much Hair Loss Is Normal?

Hair is made of keratin, which is a protein and the average person has around 100.000 hairs on their head.  This protein is the same that makes up our nails.  The hair that you can see is actually dead tissue and we can lose up to 100 strands each day.  The living follicles, which are bulb shaped, are underneath the scalp’s surface.

Hair normally grows around half an inch per month, slowing down with age.   Sometimes the hair may not grow and just rest, it then usually falls out and the follicle replaces it.  If something happens that disrupts this cycle, the hair falls out but isn`t replaced.  This is what happens with menopause hair loss and general thinning.

The average head has about 100,000 hairs. Your hair grows and is shed regularly. You usually lose 50 to 100 strands each day. If you have a normal head of hair, you probably don’t notice this small loss.

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Hair loss affects around 2/3 of women

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Hair usually grows about half an inch per month, although this slows as you age. Each hair remains on your head for two to six years, and during most of this time it is continually growing.

As a hair gets older, it may enter a `resting` stage in which it remains on your head but doesn’t actually grow. At the end of this stage, the hair usually falls out. Usually, the follicle replaces it in about six months. But unfortunately many factors can disrupt this cycle. The result can be that your hair falls out early or isn’t replaced.

Pinpointing The Trigger

If sudden hair loss occurs, consider if anything `out of the ordinary` happened up to three months before.  Factors triggering hair loss can take up to three months before their effects are noticeable.

Possible Causes

Things such as a hormone levels, stress and anxiety, trauma, stating a new medication or a medical diagnosis, can all be the cause.  Of course menopause hair loss is merely another sign of menopause.

Hair loss in women is a potentially depressing symptom, as a woman´s hair is associated with her femininity and sexuality.  As soon as you notice a problem, visit your doctor and discuss the options.

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  1. […] Hair loss can have a devastating effect on a womans confidence, as her hair is very much a part of who she is. Losing an excessive amount of hair during menopause is usually a direct result of those pesky hormone levels. The two main hormones involved in hair growth are estrogen and testosterone. Another hormone, androgen, increases as the levels of estrogen decrease. […]

  2. […] book The Complete Menopause due to her own experiences of “the change”. Read more about Hair Loss on her new […]

  3. […] Hot Flashes, Night Sweats, Sleeplessness and more. Naturally Hair loss can have a devastating effect on a womans confidence, as her hair is very much a part of who she […]

  4. […] Hair loss can have a harmful outcome on a womans confidence, as her hair is unequivocally many a partial of who she is. Losing an extreme volume of hair during menopause is customarily a proceed outcome of those annoying hormone levels. The dual categorical hormones concerned in hair expansion have been estrogen as well as testosterone. Another hormone, androgen, increases as a levels of estrogen decrease. […]

  5. Just want to say that it usually does grow back eventually – mine did. Not quite as thick as it was before, but at least it`s come back.

  6. Does anyone recommend any online wig companies? I`m too embarrased to go into a store

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